About your Search

20130301
20130331
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
was the intersection of film technology -- technology with an emphasis on social change. >> host: your dedication page reads in part to my mother and father the greatest boomers i know. let's talk about that generation for a minute because they get some flack for some mistakes that they made and have made. >> guest: i think the boomer generation was an incredibly and is an incredibly important generation and our nations history. much of what is going on today in america would not have been possible without them. the civil rights movement which they played a leading role in pushing out forward and ending the war in vietnam and changing the way we viewed citizen involvement in government, changing the way we think about our elected officials and the ability to create up star movements. i think all that was incredibly important and the beginning of the women's movement all that great activism that it produced and all of that we are seeing that directly play out today whether it's the election of barack obama or the continued advancement of women in congress so all that is a direct result of their activis
for his beliefs, and the police may change a bit over the years is not terribly much. they are still fighting for them. and i think that's inspiring. [inaudible] >> dina, thank you. [applause] >> thank you very much. >> is there a nonfiction author or book you would like to see featured on booktv? send us an e-mail at booktv@c-span.org. or tweet us at twitter.com/booktv. >> up next on booktv, "after words" with guest host this week, msnbc host s. e. cupp. this week david burstein and his book "fast future: how the millennial generation is shaping our world." in the county argued there are currently between 18 and 30 years of age are the largest generation in u.s. history. more ethnically diverse than digitally tuned in than others. mr. burstein says melinda's are increasing and more influential a fast-moving, more integrated world. this program lasts about an hour. >> host: so, david, your millennial writing about millennials sort of advising town elders about the issues of a generation. that takes some background. how old are you? >> guest: 24. >> host: where did you go to school?
for his beliefs. their beliefs may have changed over the years, but not terribly much, and they're still fighting for them, and i think that's inspiring. >> thanks a million. >> thank you. thank you very much. [applause] >> up next, after words with guest host, s.e. cupp. this week, david burstein, and his book, "fast future: how the millenial generation is shaping our world. "o'he argues those between 18 and 30 years of age are more ethnically diverse and digitally tuned in an others and millenials are more influence shall and a fast moving, more integrated world. the program lasts about an hour. >> david, you're a millenial, writing about millenials. how old are you? >> guest: i'm 24. >> host: give me your background. where kid did you grow up? >> guest: i grew up in western connecticut, an hour out of new york city, and as a student in high school i started the film festival for high school students in which we saw great films about young people, issues about bullying and teen south s, this is in 2003, way before being part of the national conversation, and seeing the power of film i
influence as an ability to change the perception of the situation in order to market people in terms of moving in that sort of direction to stop doing something and creating incentives both sticks and carrots to get people to be given a certain way. >> host: so how exactly is it declining? because i think if you ask a lot of people today coming you would say okay maybe there are new ceos of the top of the organizations, but they are still making enormous paychecks and yield a lot of power, and we see more and more countries that seem to be emerging as strong players on the global stage. how is that not just a shift in the redistribution of power? how was what we are witnessing actually eight equine? >> guest: it's one of the players you mentioned. well paid ceos and heads of state and countries that are coming into play in the geopolitics arena and have more say than before, all of the players have less power than before. they can do less with it than their predecessors could do. take any one of those and you will see that they are more constrained. think about the ceos of the banks
use influence as ability to change the perception of situation in order to mock people in terms of moving in a certain direction or stop doing something, and power just creating incentives both sticks and carrots in order get people to behave in a certain way. house of representatives and so how exactly is a declining? because i think if you ask a lot of people today they would say okay, maybe there are new ceos of the top of organizations but they are still making enormous paychecks and wield a lot of power. and we see more and more countries seem to be emerging as strong players on the global stage. so how is that not just as shift and a redistribution of power? how is what we're witnessing actually a declines because each one of the players you mentioned well-paid ceos, heads of state, new countries that are coming and having a play in the geopolitics of arena and have more say than before. all of these players have power but they have less power than before. they can do less with it than their predecessors could do. take any one of those and you will see that they are more c
for the bailout, and i'm sure you do as well. have you been able to change anybody's mind who perhaps opposed the bailout and then upon seeing the results felt that in retrospect it was a good idea? >> guest: we became known as government motors to a lot of people. no question that hurt gm and continues to target today. but we did pay back the loan to the government, and we have payback a lot of the equity investment the government made. and yes, i think people want gm to succeed. the government motors label is still there to some extent, still affects some people but i think it is less now. and i think once the indebtedness is totally pay, i think that will go away. >> in the book you talk about what you found when you arrive at general motors. a lot of it was not necessarily apparent to the public. the financial results were, but what you then we started looking underneath the hood so to speak is revealed very much in the first time in the book. chair with a a little bit about some of the surprises for you as a seasoned executive when you arrived in detroit. >> guest: well, i expected certa
are interrelated and influence in the book, use influence as the ability to change the perception of the situation in order to moderate people in terms of moving in a certain direction or stopping doing something and power and just creating incentives both sticks and carrots in order to get people to behave in a certain way. >> host: how exactly is it declining, because i think if you asked a lot of people today they would say okay maybe there are new ceos at the top of our organizations that they are still making enormous paychecks and yields a lot of power and we see more and more countries that seem to be emerging as strong players on the global stage. so how is that not just a shift and a redistribution of power? how is what you are saying actually declined? >> guest: each one of the players you mentioned, well paid ceos and heads of states and new countries that are displaying the geopolitics of renowned and have a large say, all of these have power but they have less power than before and they can do less than their successors could do. pick any one of those and you will see they are more co
states about what has changed on the ground in israel and in the palestinian territories, and were each of the player was, netanyahu and mahmoud abbas. there is also the sense that a few the american president you can make anything move, and then you go against reality. it's not enough to be the candidate of change, the president of change. there is certainly out on the ground. sometimes the person of a president can help make things move along. but you have to remember that players on the ground have their own agendas, their own domestic considerations. their own fears and concerns about what they can give up on or not give up on. then there was this moment where hillary clinton showed her loyalty to the president. and without too much to the readers about the flaws, there's this moment where she shows loyalty and enterprises statement that the president has made, and a way that the players on the ground, the palestinians and israelis, feel they are now stuck in a certain position and they have to block that. of the palestinians are sitting there thinking, we're not going to be more br
. but there was a misreading in the united states about what had changed on the ground in israel and in the palestinian territories and where each of the players was, be it netanyahu and abbas. and there is often the sense that if you're the american president, you can make anything move. and then you bump against reality. it's not enough to be, obviously, the candidate of change, the president of change. there is a certain reality on the ground. sometimes the personality of a president can help make things move along. but you have to remember that players on the ground have their own agendas, their own domestic, um, considerations, their own fears and concerns. about what they can give up on or not give up on. and then there was this moment where hillary clinton shows her loyalty to the president, and without revealing too much to the readers about the plot, um, there was this moment where she shows loyalty and emphasizes a statement that the president has made in a way that the players on the ground, the palestinians and the israelis, feel that they're now stuck in a surgeon position, and they have t
pressures and the things that need to change in order for us to have the charitable sector that we all want. >> host: great. i definitely think that your ability to articulate the problem and take the problem that we face in normandy and the serious nature is exceptional and that does differentiate from some of these other books. you know you start early enough in the book discussing the american red cross and i think doing a good job of dissecting some of the serious problems. you make the following statements. you say when even the highest revenue chair the which is by the way around $3 billion a year in the country is bound together by rubber band n..tape it is a sign of her found misunderstanding of how to build effective charity. the question that i have for you as i read that is if the american red cross is not managing its performance well to ensure that its efficient it's efficient and effective in getting good results, who is going to be able to achieve that and bring it to scale and what are your thoughts on that? >> guest: the problem with the red cross and there's a lot in that
. india and china are the big ones. and so they were exporting this through to other countries. changing their diet the way that our diet changes. starting about a hundred years ago. >> he made suggestions about what we can do better in your book. >> yes, it is kind of the stuff that has lower ingredients. it is one easy answer. and the simple advice when you go to the grocery store, most of the fresh food is around the perimeter. and then think a little bit about solutions. trying to do more cooking at home. the food industry has this whole history and pattern of cooking. all you need to do is open up the microwave and heat up your dinner. it is really not that complicated. a lot of people are busy, but everyone has the time for simple and easy solutions even for doing one meal at home a week additional. >> [inaudible] >> have you done any research on the different methods between frying and baking and microwaving? i have heard that the microwave destroys the nutrients in that kind of thing in the food? >> is the extent of how you cook at high temperatures. higher than what you would us
the talks but all the misreadings in the united states about what had changed on the ground in israel and the palestinian territory and where each of the players was. netanyahu and mahmoud and there is also the sense that if you are the american president you can make anything move. then you bump up against reality. there is a certain reality on the ground. sometimes the personality of a president can help make things move along but you have to remember that players on the ground have their own agendas, their own domestic considerations, their own fears and concerns about what they can give up on are not give up on and then there was this moment where hillary clinton showed her loyalty to the president. without giving too much to the readers about the plot, there is a moment where she showed loyalty in a statement that the president had made in a way that the players on the ground and the israelis feel they are stuck in a certain position and they have to unblock that. some are thinking well we are not going to be more british than the british or more royal than the king. we are going
to understand how charities need to be more effective. and the market pressures and what needs to change in order for us to have the charitable sector that we all want. >> host: great. i definitely think that your ability to articulate the problem and to face the problem that we face, the enormity of it and the serious nature of it is exceptional and it doesn't differentiate from some of these other books. you start early often about discussing the american red cross, and i think doing a good job of dissecting some this is problems that they face. you make the following statement. you say, when even the highest revenue charity, by the way around 3 billion a year, in the country is bound together by rubber bands and to date, it is a sign of profound misunderstanding of how to build effective charities. so the question that i have for you as i read that is, if the american red cross is not managing its performance well, to assure it is efficient and effective in getting good results, who's going to be able to achieve that and bring it to scale? what are your thoughts on that? >> guest: so
mentioned in 40 years, there's been virtually know -- no change in the largest organization. so it's not to the proliferation of smile organizations but isn't the bigger problem massive, massive charities that may be very effective at marketing themselves but very poor at really showing results. would you agree with me that's a bigger problem? >> guest: i would agree. they're actually part and parcel of the same overarching problem. i think they're all part of the failure of creative instruction. so we all know from in my case, my economics in college, 122 years ago, that one of the great things about the for-profit, the free enterprise market place, this motion of construction. peep with great ideas win, and bold willed outdated ideas that don't work, lose. doesn't work the charitable sector. the study is that the top 40 -- if you look at the fortune 500, fortune 50, from 40 years ago, you find that bethlehem steel, the american can, they're all gone, replace bid apple and google. that's why the american economy still works. on the charitable side it doesn't work because it's the
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)